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Compentencies for Grades K-1

AFFECTIVE GOALS

  • Students will transfer what they learn at school to a home environment
  • Students will participate in Friday evening Shabbat services
  • Students will feel that they are part of the Jewish community
  • Students will feel proud of the accomplishments of the Jewish people
  • Students will feel comfortable during Jewish rituals and services
  • Students will want to create art, music, or literature with Jewish themes
  • Students will feel an affinity with the state of Israel

HEBREW

Students will be able to identify ten printed Hebrew letters: shin, bet, tav, lamed, mem, final mem, hay, resh, holam, and lamed (see appendix), and make the sound each represents.
Using verbal cues, students will be able to translate verbally the words on Word List 1 from English to Hebrew and vice versa (see appendix).

PRAYER (Sh’ma, wine, motsee, Hanukkah candles, four questions)

  • Using a one-word cue (Sh’ma, wine, and motsee), students will be able to recite verbally, without assistance:
  • The Sh’ma sentence
  • The wine blessing
  • The blessing over bread, or motsee.
  • Using the sung first three words of the three Hanukkah blessings as a cue, students will sing the three blessings, without assistance.
  • Using a brief cue for each (Mah nishtana, matza, maror, matbeeleen, and yoshveen), students will sing the four questions of the Passover seder.


BIBLE (Genesis 1-18)

  • All of the following competencies may be reached with support:
  • Students will be able to recite the five English/Greek names of the Torah books, without cue: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy.
  • Students will be able to tell (SWBATT) the Torah creation legend: Genesis 1:1-2:4
  • SWBATT the legend of Adam and Eve: Genesis 2:4-2:24
  • SWBATT the tree of knowledge of good and evil legend: Gen. 2:25-3:24
  • SWBATT the legend of Cain and Abel: Gen. 4:1-16
  • SWBATT the legend of Noah’s flood: Gen. 6:5-22 and 7:11-8:19
  • SWBATT the rainbow legend: Gen. 9:8-17
  • SWBATT the legend of the tower of Babel: Gen. 11:1-9
  • SWBATT the origin story of Abraham and Sarah: Gen. 11:31-12:9
  • SWBATT the parting of Abraham and Lot: Gen. 13:5-12
  • SWBATT the legend of Sarah and Hagar: Gen.: 16:1-16
  • SWBATT the story of God and Abraham’s covenant: Gen. 17:1-8 & 15-21
  • SWBATT the legend of Abraham’s visitors: Gen. 18:1-15
  • SWBATT the legend of Sodom: Gen. 18:16-32

HISTORY

No competencies required for this category.

ETHICS / MITSVOT (kindness)

  • Students will be able to translate the word hesed as loving-kindness.
  • Students will be able to list, without cues, at least three basic aspects of Jewish obligations about kindness (see appendix).

HOLIDAYS (names and symbols)

  • Students will be able to name at least six of the twelve major holidays without cue (see appendix).
  • Students will be able to name, or draw, one symbol or tradition for each holiday named.

ISRAEL (basic geography)

  • Students will be able to identify Israel as the world’s only Jewish nation.
  • Students will be able to identify Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
  • Using a world map, students will be able to find Israel.
  • Using an unlabeled map of Israel, students will identify three Israeli cities, one river, two seas, and two regions.

JEWISH LIFE & COMMUNITY (ritual objects as home)

  • Using pictoral prompts, students will identify eight of the following items: Shabbat candlesticks, Kiddush cup, hallah plate, seder plate, hanukkiah, mezuza, TaNaKh, siddur, kippah, tallit, magen-David, dreidl, gragger.

ARTS AND LITERATURE

  • Students will be able to re-tell a folk-tale about the fabled town of Chelm.
  • Students will create, and use at home, at least one of the ritual items listed under Jewish Life & Community.
  • Students will be able to sing, with the song title and melody as cues, the following Hebrew songs:

- Daveed Meleh Yisrael
- LaKova Sheli
- Yom Rishon, Avodah
- Shalom Havereem
- Ufaratsta

Competencies for Grade 2-3

AFFECTIVE GOALS

  • Students will transfer what they learn at school to a home environment
  • Students will participate in Friday evening Shabbat services
  • Students will feel that they are part of the Jewish community
  • Students will feel proud of the accomplishments of the Jewish people
  • Students will feel comfortable during Jewish rituals and services
  • Students will want to create art, music, or literature with Jewish themes
  • Students will feel an affinity with the state of Israel

HEBREW

Students will be able to identify all printed Hebrew letters and vowels (see appendix), and make the sound each represents.

Using verbal cues, students will be able to translate verbally the words on Word List 2 from English to Hebrew and vice versa (see appendix).

PRAYER (T’FILAH) (Barhu, V’shamru, Mee sheh-berah, Shabbat candles)

  • Using a brief cue (Barhu, V’shamru, Mee-sheh-berah, ner shel Shabbat), students will be able to recite verbally, without assistance:
  • The Barhu (call to worship)
  • V’shamru (three verses)
  • The Mee-sheh-berah
  • The Shabbat candle blessing
  • Students will also master the t’filah competencies of grade K/1.

BIBLE (Genesis 21-end)

All of the following competencies may be reached with support:

  • Students will be able to tell (SWBATT) of the birth of Isaac:  Gen. 21:1-8
  • SWBATT the story of the birth of Ishmael to Sarah: Gen. 21:9-21
  • SWBATT Abraham’s servant’s mission to find a wife for Isaac: Gen. 24:1-67
  • SWBATT the story of the birth of Isaac and Rebecca’s twins: Gen. 25:19-26
  • SWBATT the story of Esau rejecting his birthright: Gen. 25:27-34
  • SWBATT the story of the deception of Isaac: Gen. 27:1-45
  • SWBATT the story of Jacob’s dream of the stairway: Gen. 28:10-22
  • SWBATT the story of Jacob and Rachel meeting at the well: Gen. 29:1-14
  • SWBATT the story of Jacob’s marriage to Leah and Rachel: Gen. 29:15-35 
  • SWBATT the story of Rachel’s and Leah’s children: Gen. 30:1-24
  • SWBATT the departure of Jacob’s family for Canaan: Gen. 31:14-54 and 32:1-3
  • SWBATT about Jacob’s preparation to meet Esau: Gen. 32:4-22
  • SWBATT about Jacob’s wrestling with a divine messenger: Gen. 32:23-33
  • SWBATT about the reunion of Jacob and Esau: Gen. 33:1-17
  • SWBATT the story of the death of Rachel and Benjamin’s birth: Gen. 35:16-21
  • SWBATT the story of Joseph and his brothers: Gen. 37:1-36
  • SWBATT the story of Joseph and Potiphar: Gen. 39:1-23

HISTORY

No competencies required for this category.

ETHICS/MITSVOT (regarding animals)

  • Students will verbally identify the Hebrew phrase tsa-ar ba’aley hayim as “concern for the suffering of animals.”
  • Students will be able to name five Jewish laws about the treatment of animals (see appendix).

HOLIDAYS (objects, stories and traditions)

  • Students will be able to connect each Jewish holiday to its season.
  • Students will be able to connect each Jewish holiday, including Shabbat to its primary objects and traditions.

ISRAEL (Bible places in Israel)

Students will be able to connect these places in Israel to the Biblical people or stories connected with them:

  • Jerusalem (King David)
  • Jaffa (Jonah)
  • Beersheva (Abraham and Sarah)
  • Sea of Reeds (Moses)
  • Bethlehem (Rachel, Ruth)
  • Jericho (Joshua)
  • Hebron (King David)
  • Dead Sea (Lot)
  • Ein Gedi (King David)
  • Eilat (King Solomon)
  • Jordan River (Ark of the Covenant, Joshua 3:15-17)

JEWISH LIFE & COMMUNITY (KI and other synagogues in Allentown)

  • Students will be able to lead a tour around Keneseth Israel’s building, pointing out and identifying the offices, classrooms, library, board room, social halls, sanctuary, sukkah and kitchen.
  • Students will be able to locate and identify the congregation’s Torah scrolls, prayerbooks, tallits, photos of past confirmation classes, newsletter, candlesticks and Kiddush cups.
  • Students will be able to identify by name the local Orthodox and Conservative synagogues in Allentown. 
  • From one of KI’s eastern windows, students will be able to locate the Muhlenberg College Hillel building and identify its function.

ARTS AND LITERATURE

  • Students will be able to re-tell a folktake about Herschel of Ostropol.
  • Students will create, and use at home, at least one of these ritual items: Shabbat candlesticks, Kiddush cup, hallah plate, seder plate, hanukkiah, mezuza, TaNaKh, siddur, kippah, tallit, magen-David, dreidl, gragger.
  • Students will be able to sing, with the song title and melody as cues, the following Hebrew songs:

- La-kova Sheli
- Yom Rishon, Avoda
- Heveinu Shalom Aleichem
- L’Shana Ha-ba’a
- V’Taher Libenu

Competencies for Grade 4

AFFECTIVE GOALS

  • Students will transfer what they learn at school to a home environment
  • Students will participate in Friday evening Shabbat services
  • Students will feel that they are part of the Jewish community
  • Students will feel proud of the accomplishments of the Jewish people
  • Students will feel comfortable during Jewish rituals and services
  • Students will want to create art, music, or literature with Jewish themes
  • Students will feel an affinity with the state of Israel

HEBREW

  • Students will be able to read one-syllable Hebrew words fluently, and make the sound each represents.
  • Using verbal cues, students will be able to translate verbally the words on Word List 3 from English to Hebrew and vice versa (see appendix).

PRAYER (beginning of Amida, L’ha Dodi)

  • Using a one-phrase cue (Avot, L’ha Dodi), students will be able to sing verbally, without assistance:
  • Avot, the first paragraph of the Amida
  • The first two, and last, verses of L’ha Dodi, and its refrain

BIBLE (Exodus, Jonah, 10 Commandments)

  • Students will re-tell the story of the prophet Jonah (chapters 1-4)
  • Students will be able to tell (SWBATT) the story of the new Pharaoh’s enslavement of the Hebrews: Exodus 1:8-22
  • SWBATT the legend of the birth and adoption of Moses: Ex. 2:1-10
  • SWBATT the taskmaster’s death and Moses’ flight: Ex. 2:11-22
  • SWBATT the burning bush and the mission of Moses:  Ex. 2:23 – 3:22
  • SWBATT Moses’ and Aaron’s signs and wonders: Ex. 4:1 – 17
  • SWBATT the first encounter of Moses, Aaron and Pharaoh: Ex. 5:1-14
  • SWBATT  about the increased workload of the Israelites: Ex. 5:15 – 23
  • SWBATT God’s promise to the Israelites: Ex. 6:1 – 7:13
  • SWBATT of Moses’ and Aaron’s magical demonstration, and the blood plague: Ex. 7:1-24
  • SWBATT the story of the frog and lice plagues: Ex. 8:1-15
  • SWBATT the story of the plague of insect swarms: Ex. 8:16-28
  • SWBATT the livestock-disease, boils, and hail plagues:  Ex.: 9:1-35
  • SWBATT the story of the locust and darkness plagues: Ex.  10:1-29
  • SWBATT instructions for Pesah observance: Ex. 12:1-28 and 43-51, and Num. 9:1-14
  • SWBATT about the plague of the firstborn: Ex. 11:1-10 and 12:29-42 and 13:1-16
  • SWBATT the Israelites’ flight from Egypt: Ex. 13:17-22 and 14:1-30
  • SWBATT the legend of the manna: Ex. 16:1-36 and Num. 11:1-23
  • SWBATT the legend of Moses striking the rock to get water, and Amalek: Ex. 17:1-16
  • SWBATT Moses’ appointing judges over the people: Ex. 18:1-27
  • SWBAT list, in abbreviated form, the ten commandments: Ex. 20:1-14
  • SWBAT name five of the ethical/social laws described in Ex. 21-23

HISTORY (Roman period)

  • Students will identify the Oral Torah as the conveyed interpretation by the rabbis.
  • Students will identify the Pharisees as the proponents of ongoing interpretation of Torah.
  • Students will identify the Pharisees as the Jews who focused more on prayer and study than on Temple sacrifice.
  • Students will identify Hillel and Shammai as founders of two great Pharisaic academies of Jewish study.
  • Students will identify the Dead Sea Scrolls as the texts of the separatist Jewish Essenes.
  • Students will identify King Herod as a puppet king under the Romans who built many great structures, including the second Temple, but committed atrocities against his people.
  • Students will identify the Sanhedrin as the Jewish Supreme Court during Roman times.
  • Students will identify the causes and result of the Jewish rebellion against Rome.
  • Students will be able to re-tell the events of the martyrdom at Masada.
  • Students will be able to re-tell the story of Rabbi Yohanan ben-Zakkai’s escape from besieged Jerusalem and his petition to General Vespasian.
  • Students will be able to explain how Yohanan ben-Zakkai, at his academy at Yavneh, created a new form of Judaism to replace the sacrifice-centered religion.
  • Students will be able to describe the last Jewish rebellion against Rome under Simon Bar-Kochba.

ETHICS/MITSVOT (peace, family, Hadassah, Rabbi Hillel)

  • Students will connect “tsedaka” to tsedek (justice) as opposed to charity
  • Students will say or write the fifth Commandment (Exodus 20:12)
  • Students will be able to re-state the Leviticus law that we must “rise up before the gray head.” (Lev. 19:32)
  • Students will be able to re-state the rule from Ta’anit in the Jerusalem Talmud: “By three things the world is preserved, by justice, by truth, and by peace, and these three are one: if justice has been accomplished, so has truth, and so has peace.”
  • Students will be able to identify Aaron as a rodef shalom, a peacemaker
  • Students will identify  Hadassah as an international Jewish women’s educational and medical organization.
  • Students will identify three facts about Jerusalem’s Hadassah Hospital
  • Students will identify Rabbi Hillel as a first-century sage, whose wisdom is recorded in the Mishna.
  • Students will be able to re-tell the story of the pagan who asked Shammai and Hillel to teach him Torah while he stood on one foot.
  • Students will be able to quote from memory three sayings of Rabbi Hillel (see appendix)

HOLIDAYS (vocabulary)

Students will be able to define, with 80% accuracy, vocabulary associated with the Jewish holidays (see appendix)

ISRAEL (places in Israel, Israeli kids, and nature)

  • Students will be able to find, on a map of Israel: Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa, Barsheva, Eilat, the Mediterranean Sea, the Red Sea, the sea of Galilee, the Dead Sea, the Jordan River, the Golan Heights, the Negev, the Judean Hills, the Jezreel Valley, and Bethlehem.
  • With photographs as prompts, students will be able to identify the Western Wall, Masada, Ein Gedi, the Knesset, the Jaffa Gate, Hadassah Hospital, the Shrine of the Book, Yad Vashem, the Ba’hai Garden, and the Jerusalem shuq.
  • Students will identify the languages Israeli schoolchildren learn as Hebrew, Arabic and English.
  • Students will describe the schedule of Israeli schools as Sunday through Thursday, with a short day on Friday.
  • Students will identify Sukkot, Passover, and Shavuot among the school holidays in Israel.
  • Students will identify tzofim as the Israel Scout Federation, Israeli’s largest youth movement.
  • Students will identify the two most popular team sports in Israel as basketball and soccer.
  • Students will explain the army service requirements if Israeli teens
  • Students will identify the Maccabiah as the international Jewish Olympics held every four years near Tel Aviv.
  • Students will identify Ein Gedi as an oasis and nature preserve south of Jerusalem which is home to foxes, ibex, hyrax, and leopards.

JEWISH LIFE & COMMUNITY (JCC, JDS, and birth rituals)

  • Students will identify brit milah and brit bat as the ceremonies that welcome Jewish babies into the covenant or brit.
  • Students will identify the age of a Jewish boy’s age at his brit milah as eight days.
  • Students will be able to define mohel, sandek, and kisay Eliahu.
  • Students will be able to explain the difference between Ashkenazic and Sefardic baby-naming traditions.
  • Students will be able to navigate from Keneseth Israel to the Jewish Community Center.
  • Students will be able to name at least four functions of the JCC (gym, basketball court, pool, camp, afterschool programs, theater, music lessons)
  • Students will be able to name three differences between the Jewish Day School and their public school

ARTS AND LITERATURE

  • Students will be able to re-tell a story by Sholom Aleichem.
  • Students will create, and use at home, at least one of these ritual items: Shabbat candlesticks, Kiddush cup, hallah plate, seder plate, hanukkiah, mezuza, TaNaKh, siddur, kippah, tallit, magen-David, dreidl, gragger.
  • Students will be able to sing, with the song title and melody as cues, the following Hebrew songs:

- V’nomar L’fanav
- Mayim B’Sasson
- Eretz Zavat Halav
- Lo Yisa Goy

Competencies for Grade 5

AFFECTIVE GOALS

  • Students will transfer what they learn at school to a home environment
  • Students will participate in Friday evening Shabbat services
  • Students will feel that they are part of the Jewish community
  • Students will feel proud of the accomplishments of the Jewish people
  • Students will feel comfortable during Jewish rituals and services
  • Students will want to create art, music, or literature with Jewish themes
  • Students will feel an affinity with the state of Israel

HEBREW

  • Students will be able to read two-syllable Hebrew words fluently.
  • Using verbal cues, students will be able to translate verbally the words on Word List 4 from English to Hebrew and vice versa (see appendix).

PRAYER (Kiddush, Amida, Mee Kamoha)

  • Using a one-phrase cue (Kiddush, S’fatai, G’vurot, Mee Kamoha), students will be able to sing verbally, without assistance:
  • The Friday evening Kiddush
  • The lines of Mee Kamoha that introduce the Amida
  • G’vurot, the second paragraph of the Amida

BIBLE (Numbers, Joshua, names of prophetical books)

  • Students will be able to (SWBAT) write or say the names of the books of Prophets (Nevee’eem), without cue (see appendix)

            Numbers

  • SWBAT name, either verbally or in writing, the names of the twelve tribes of Israel, as enumerated in Numbers 1:3-15
  • SWBAT explain the origins of the Levite tribe and their priestly duties as described in Num. 3:1-13 and Num. 8:1-26
  • SWBAT explain the concept of the nazirite and its rules, and the Priestly Blessing, described in Num. 6:1-27
  • SWBAT describe the legendary cloud over the Tabernacle: Num. 9:15-23
  • SWBAT tell the story of Miriam’s leprosy: Num. 12:1-16
  • SWBAT the story of the twelve spies: Num. 13:1 - 14:45
  • SWBAT tell the story of the blessing of Balaam’s blessing: Num. 22:2 – 23:12 and 24:1-13
  • SWBAT the case of the daughters of Zelophehad: Num. 27:1-11 and 36:1-12
  • SWBAT narrate the commission of Joshua, son of Nun: Num. 27:12-23

            Joshua

  • SWBAT tell the legend of the spies in Jericho: Josh. 2:1-24
  • SWBAT tell the legend of the conquest of Jericho: Josh. 6:1-27
  • SWBAT tell the legend of the sun standing still at Gibeon: Josh. 10:5-15
  • SWBAT tell the purpose and rules of the sanctuary cities: Josh. 20:1-9

HISTORY (Medieval Sepharad, Ladino)

  • Students will identify the Sephardic Jewish community as those who trace their beginnings to the exiles in Babylonia
  • Students will identify the caravan trail into Arabia followed by Jews fleeing the Romans in Palestine
  • Students will identify Muhammed as the prophet of Islam who lived in Mecca in the sixth century
  • Students will name five parallels between Islam and Judaism (see appendix)
  • Students will identify three aspects of Jewish-Muslim cooperation within the Islamic empire
  • Students will identify the siddur as the response to an inquiry about prayer sent by Spanish Jews to Rav Amram in Babylonia
  • Students will identify the quotation, “My heart is in the east, while I am in the west” as written by Spanish Jewish poet Judah Halevi
  • Students will identify Shmuel ha-Nagid (Samuel the Prince) as a Granada governor, poet, scholar and general in the Muslim army
  • Students will identify Maimonides (the RaMBaM) as Moshe ben Maimon, the Spanish/Egyptian rabbi who composed important guides to Judaism like the Mishneh Torah and The Guide to the Perplexed.
  • Students will connect the end of the Golden Age of Spain with the Spanish Inquisition in the late 1400s.
  • Students will identify 1492 as the year the Catholic rulers of Spain expelled all Jews from Spain and Portugal.
  • Students will name three non-Catholic countries to which the Spanish Jews fled (Holland, Syria, New Amsterdam, Turkey, Egypt)
  • Students will re-tell the story of Dona Gracia Mendes, the Angel of the Marranos
  • Students will identify Baruch Spinoza as a Dutch philosopher who was excommunicated from the Jewish community for proposing that God was not a being, but a part of the natural world
  • Students will identify Ladino as the language of the Spanish Jews.
  • Students will be able to translate into English two Ladino phrases (mazal bueno or good luck, ke haber or what’s up, pal, kaminos de leche i miel or [may you follow] paths of milk and honey)
  • Students will be able to sing the Ladino Hanukkah song Ocho Kandelikas

ETHICS (Speech, truth, Rabbi Akiva, AJWS)

  • Students will be able to repeat Leviticus 19:16 (You shall not go up and down as a tale-bearer among your people)
  • Students will be able to define lashon ha-ra as discrediting or saying negative things about a person, even if those negative things are true
  • Students will be able to detail three examples of forbidden speech (see appendix)
  • Students will be able to repeat the lesson from Talmud Arahin 15b: Lashon ha-ra (the evil tongue) kills three: the person who speaks it, the person who hears it, and the person spoken about
  • Students will be able to re-tell the Hassidic story about gossip involving a feather pillow
  • Students will be able to identify the AJWS (American Jewish World Service) as a Jewish poverty-fighting and human-rights organization.
  • Students will be able to identify three international efforts of the AJWS
  • Students will be able to identify Rabbi Akiva as a scholar and revolutionary martyred after the last Jewish revolt against Rome
  • Students will re-tell the legend of Akiva’s beginning his studies at the age of forty
  • Students will re-tell the story of Akiva’s marriage and his separation from his wife
  • Students will be able to quote Akiva’s summary of the Torah: 'Love your fellow as yourself'- This is the main principle of the Torah.
  • Students will be able to re-state Maimonides’ ruling in the Mishneh Torah that waste or needless destruction of resources and materials (Laws of Discernment, chapter 5)

HOLIDAYS (Calendar, Jewish time, connection to nature and Israel)

  • Students will identify the four Jewish holidays that occur under the full moon
  • Students will be able to name four Hebrew months that have holidays
  • Students will connect Shabbat with a tradition of reducing our use of resources
  • Students will connect the Torah principle of the sabbatical year and sh’mita, letting the land rest, with Rosh Hashana
  • Students will associate the phrase “tikkun olam” with repairing the planet
  • Students will connect the story of the world’s creation with human responsibility to protect the earth
  • Students will associate the experience of being in a sukkah with being closer to the natural environment
  • Students will identify the four species in the lulav, listed in Lev. 23:40
  • Students will connect the Hanukkah oil miracle legend with the obligation to conserve the earth’s resources
  • Students will be able to explain the negative effects of untrammeled consumerism on the environment
  • Students will be able to connect the term baal tashhit with the concept of the proscription against waste and needless destruction
  • Students will be able to tell the legend of Honi and the carob tree
  • Students will be able to name three species of trees that grow in Israel, in English and Hebrew
  • Students will be able to suggest three ways in which the traditions of Purim costumes and mashloah manot can be adapted to be more environmentally friendly
  • Students will be able to suggest a way that s/he personally can, like Queen Esther, stand up for the defenseless
  • Students will be able to name a way to get rid of hametz without wasting food
  • Students will collaboratively write a list of ten modern plagues that threaten the earth
  • Students will choose one way to reduce the use of disposable materials at the Passover seder
  • Students will be able to plan a day of Shavuot meals without meat

ISRAEL (basic pre-modern Israel history)

Students will be able to identify the significance of these dates in Israel’s history:

1000 BCE 313 CE
722 BCE 636 CE
586 BCE 1099 CE
163 BCE 1517 CE
70 CE 1860 CE
 

JEWISH LIFE & COMMUNITY (Federation, Maccabiah, b’mitsva)

  • Students will be able to identify three programs of the Jewish Federation of the Lehigh Valley
  • Students will be able to name the local Jewish newspaper
  • Students will be able to name five events of the international Maccabiah
  • Students will be able to name the international regions represented at the quadrennial Maccabiah
  • Students will be able to identify the age of thirteen as when a Jewish child is expected to take on adult responsibilities.
  • Students will be able to name three changes in Jewish legal status that occur at age 13 (be counted in a minyan, have an aliyah, enter into contracts, wear tfillin and tallit, fast on Yom Kippur, etc.)
  • Students will identify the customary celebration of becoming bar- or bat-mitsva as being called to read the last Torah reading on Shabbat (the maftir) and the parallel reading from Prophets (haftara)
  • Students will identify 1922 as the year of the first bat-mitsva, that of Judith Kaplan in New York
  • Students will identify a d’var Torah as the lesson the bar- or bat-mitsva offers on the bimah in their new role as an interpreter of Judaism

ARTS AND LITERATURE

  • Students will be able to describe a “2,000-Year-Old Man” routine of Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner.
  • Students will be able to re-tell a children’s story of Isaac Bashevis Singer
  • Students will be able to sing, with the song title and melody as cues, the following Hebrew songs:

- Am Yisrael Hai
- Hava Nagila
- Hiney Mah Tov
- Utsu Eitsa
- Zum Gali Gali

Competencies for Grade 6

AFFECTIVE GOALS

  • Students will transfer what they learn at school to a home environment
  • Students will participate in Friday evening Shabbat services
  • Students will feel that they are part of the Jewish community
  • Students will feel proud of the accomplishments of the Jewish people
  • Students will feel comfortable during Jewish rituals and services
  • Students will want to create art, music, or literature with Jewish themes
  • Students will feel an affinity with the state of Israel

HEBREW

  • Students will be able to read multi-syllable Hebrew words fluently.
  • Using verbal or printed cues, students will be able to translate verbally the words on Word List 5 from English to Hebrew and vice versa (see appendix).

PRAYER (Birkat ha-mazon, mourner’s kaddish, Torah blessings)

  • Using a one-phrase cue (Birkat, mourners’ Kaddish, Torah blessings), students will be able to sing verbally, using a printed text:
  • The birkat ha-mazon, abbreviated version
  • The mourners’ kaddish
  • Blessings before and after the Torah reading

BIBLE (Judges, names of Writings books, citations)

  • Students will be able to name, in order, the names of the books of Writings without prompts, in writing or verbally (see appendix)
  • Students will be able to (SWBAT) find any verse in the Bible (TaNaKh) using only numerical citations
  • SWBAT tell the story of Deborah and Barak’s rout of the Canaanites and the killing of Sisera: Judges 4:1-24
  • SWBAT tell the story of Gideon’s rise to leadership and his test of God: Judges 6:11-40
  • SWBAT tell Gideon’s strategy against Midian:  Judges 7:1-22
  • SWBAT tell the story of the birth of Samson: Judges 13:1-25
  • SWBAT tell the story of Samson’s marriage to a Philistine woman: Judges 14:1-20
  • SWBAT tell the story of Samson and Delilah, and Samson’s downfall: Judges 16:4-31

HISTORY (medieval Ashkenaz, Yiddish)

  • Students will identify the Talmud as the collected interpretations of Torah which began as the Oral Torah
  • Students will identify the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE as the beginning of the exile of Jews to Europe
  • Students will identify Jewish occupations in Germany, France, Belgium and Greece as those of traders, merchants, and scholars
  • Students will identify the conversion of the Romans to Christianity as the beginning of the oppression of Jews in Europe
  • Students will identify superstition, Church teachings and the Crusades as motivators for anti-Jewish laws and violence
  • Students will be able to describe the blood libel, well-poisoning, and the desecration of the host accusations against the Jews
  • Students will list special taxes, book burning, torture, pogroms, expulsions and executions as factors of Jewish life in medieval Europe
  • Students will explain the reasons King Boleslav invited European Jews to immigrate to Poland in 1264
  • Students will identify shtetls as small Jewish towns in Eastern Europe
  • Students will identify the creation new yeshivot as reasons for the establishment of Eastern Europe as a center of Jewish learning
  • Students will define the role of the Kabbalah and the Zohar in the rise of Jewish mysticism in Europe
  • Students will narrate the rise and fall of one of the false messiahs who appeared among European Jews in the medieval period
  • Students will identify ghettoes as areas in European cities where Jews were forced to live
  • Students will identify the Shulhan Aruh as the guide to Jewish practice composed in the 1500s
  • Students will identify Yiddish as the Jewish language based on German with Hebrew vocabulary

ETHICS (the environment, kashrut, HIAS)

  • Students will be able to re-tell the midrash about Genesis 1-2 that concludes, “Be careful not to spoil or destroy My world – for if you do, there will be nobody after you to repair it.”
  • Students will be able to re-state Rabbi Soloveitchik’s opinion on the Torah’s foundation of personal responsibility (see appendix)
  • Students will identify the siddur’s seasonal prayer for rain as an indication of the value of water
  • Students will describe two Israeli innovations in water conservation
  • Students will be able to connect the Torah law about not destroying fruit trees to its midrashic expansion of not wasting any food.
  • Students will be able to quote and explain Deuteronomy 25:4, “You will not muzzle the ox while it treads the grain.”
  • Students will be able to connect the Talmud’s Berahot 151b, “God will show mercy to those who are merciful” to aspects of the food industry
  • Students will be able to define “eco-kashrut” as a modern extension of Jewish food laws to address environmental and ethical concerns
  • Students will name three new rules about food added by Magen Tsedek, that expand the protections of traditional kashrut
  • Students will describe the origins of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society and its first programs
  • Students will describe the modern mission and programs of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society

HOLIDAYS (Torah sources of holidays, changing traditions)

  • Students will re-state one Bible or Maccabees verse each, that serve as the foundations of the High Holidays, the three pilgrimage festivals, Tu B’Shvat, and Purim
  • Students will identify one modern innovation in the observance or celebration of each of the holidays listed above 

ISRAEL (demography of Israel)

  • Students will identify the major waves of Jewish immigration to Palestine/Israel between 1561 (to Tiberias) and 1991 (from the former Soviet Union)
  • Students will define oleh, olim, and aliyah
  • Students will list six languages brought to Palestine/Israel by olim
  • Students will be able to state the population of Israel in 1948 and now
  • Students will re-tell the story of the Ethiopian aliyah in the 1980s
  • Students will explain an aspect of the conflict between culturally diverse Israelis in modern times
  • Students will explain an aspect of the conflict between Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews in Israel in modern times
  • Students will describe three aspects of the lives of Arab Israelis
  • Students will describe three aspects of the lives of Druze Israelis
  • Students will list three innovations of the Israeli high tech industry
  • Students will list three innovations of Israeli agriculture

JEWISH LIFE & COMMUNITY (local mitsva organizations, weddings)

  • Students will list the names and functions of three local mitsva organizations
  • Students will define the words shidduh, huppah, ketubah, kiddushin, nisu’in, aufruf, hatan, kallah, eideem, mikveh, sheva brahot, mazel tov, and get
  • Students will describe the three parts of a traditional Jewish wedding

ARTS AND LITERATURE

  • Students will be able to re-tell two legends about King Solomon
  • Students will be able to describe the character Rabbi Harvey by Steve Sheinkin
  • Students will be able to sing, with the song title and melody as cues, the following Hebrew songs:

- Eileh Hamda Libi
- Eili, Eili
- Gesher Tsar M’od

 

Grade 7

AFFECTIVE GOALS

  • Students will transfer what they learn at school to a home environment
  • Students will participate in Friday evening Shabbat services
  • Students will feel that they are part of the Jewish community
  • Students will feel proud of the accomplishments of the Jewish people
  • Students will feel comfortable during Jewish rituals and services
  • Students will want to create art, music, or literature with Jewish themes
  • Students will feel an affinity with the state of Israel

HEBREW

  • Students will be able to read their b’mitsva Torah portions, or other meaningful Torah verses, fluently.
  • Using printed cues, students will be able to translate verbally the words on Word List 6 from English to Hebrew and vice versa (see appendix).

PRAYER (Torah service, shiva minyan)

Students will be able to sing verbally, using a printed text:

The blessings before and after the haftara reading and the components of an evening shiva minyan:

  • Barhu
  • Ma’ariv araveem
  • Ahavat olam
  • Sh’ma and V’ahavta
  • Hashkivenu
  • Hatsi Kaddish
  • Aleinu
  • Mourner’s Kaddish

BIBLE (Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Samuel I and Isaiah)

            Leviticus / Holiness Code

  • Students will be able to (SWBAT) list verbally or in writing five of the ethical laws from             Leviticus chapter 19
  • SWBAT explain the significance of the “eye for an eye” laws of Leviticus 24:17-22
  • SWBAT explain the property and personal redemption laws of Leviticus 25:1-46

            Deuteronomy

  • SWBAT identify two differences between the Decalogue of Exodus chapter 20 and the Decalogue of Deuteronomy chapter 5
  • SWBAT identify the Sh’ma and V’Ahavta as Deut. 6:4-9, and their context
  • SWBAT list verbally or in writing five social/ethical laws of Deuteronomy 24:1-22

            Samuel I

  • SWBAT describe Hannah’s prayer and Samuel’s birth: Sam. I 1:1-28
  • SWBAT tell the story of the sons of Eli the priest: Sam. I 2:11-21
  • SWBAT tell the story of Samuel’s call to service: Sam. I  3:1-21
  • SWBAT tell about the Philistines’ capture of the Ark: Sam. I  4:1-22
  • SWBAT tell about the Israelites demanding a king: Sam. I 8:1-22
  • SWBAT tell about Samuel’s anointment of Saul:  Sam. I   9:1 - 10:27
  • SWBAT tell about Samuel’s retirement:  Sam. I  12:1-25
  • SWBAT the story of Saul’s disobedience to God: Sam. I 15:1-35
  • SWBAT tell of the call to David to replace Saul: Sam. I 16:1-23
  • SWBAT tell the legend of David vs. Goliath: Sam. I  17:1-58
  • SWBAT tell about Saul’s madness, and David and Jonathan’s friendship: 

            Sam. I  18:1-30

  • SWBAT tell about Saul’s murderous pursuit of David: Sam. I  19:1-24
  • SWBAT tell about Jonathan helping David escape: Sam. I  20:1-42
  • SWBAT describe David sparing Saul’s life at Ein Gedi:  Sam. I   24:1-23
  • SWBAT tell about Saul’s visit to the “witch” of Endor:  Sam. I   28:1-25
  • SWBAT tell the story of the death of King Saul:  Sam. I  30:1-13

            Isaiah

  • SWBAT quote approximately Isaiah on “swords into plowshares”: Isaiah           2:2-4
  • SWBAT quote approximately Isaiah’s seraphim vision: Isaiah 6:1-3
  • SWBAT quote approximately Isaiah’s words about fasting vs. justice:       Isaiah 58:5-7

HISTORY (Ashkenaz from 1600s till the Enlightenment)

  • Students will identify the location of the Sephardic Jews in the early modern era as Amsterdam, Turkey, North Africa, Greece and Syria
  • Students will identify the location of the Ashkenazic Jews in the early modern era as Germany and Eastern Europe
  • Students will describe the change in the fortunes of the Polish Jews beginning with the Cossack rebellion in the 1600s
  • Students will re-tell the narrative of either of the false messiahs David Reuveni or Shabetai Zvi
  • Students will identify the split between Jewish scholars and average working Jews as the source of the Hassidic movement in the 1700s
  • Students will summarize the philosophy of Israel ben Eliezer, the Ba’al Shem Tov, the founder of the Hassidic movement
  • Students will re-tell two Hassidic morality stories
  • Students will describe Jewish mysticism as the spiritual effort to reach God by uniting the holy sparks of creation
  • Students will identify Rabbi Elijah of Vilna, the Vilna ga’on, as the chief opponent of the superstitions, miracles and amulets of the Hassidim
  • Students will identify court Jews, or shtadlans, as the assimilated representatives of the Jewish communities in Western Europe
  • Students will explain how Moses Mendelssohn brought ideas of the Western Enlightenment to the Jews of Europe
  • Students will describe how the Enlightenment led to assimilation, the abandonment of Judaism by many Jews
  • Students will identify Napoleon as the leader who granted equal citizenship (emancipation) to the French Jews
  • Students will identify the opening of European universities to Jews in the 1800s as the beginning of Jewish study of physics, history, and Western art, philosophy, literature medicine and law

ETHICS (laws of witnesses, crime, self-defense; RAC and Heschel)

  • Students will be able to re-state Deut. 19:15 which requires the testimony of two witnesses to prove any fact in question
  • Students will list the four execution methods listed in the Mishna (Sanhedrin 7.1): stoning, burning, decapitation and strangling
  • Students will be able to name three qualities which disqualify witnesses under Torah law
  • The students will name three qualifications added by the rabbis to the status of witnesses, which effectively prevented the application of capital punishment
  • Students will re-state Exodus 12:49 (There shall be the same law for the native-born and the stranger)
  • Students will list three Biblical protections for Israelite slaves (freedom in the seventh year, rest on Shabbat and holy days, rights of property and marriage, rights of inheritance)
  • Students will be able to explain the expansion of Lev. 19:16 (You will not stand idly by the blood of your neighbor) to include stopping assault
  • Students will define rodef as a ‘pursuer’ who, if not stopped, will cause bodily harm
  • Students will re-state the Talmud law (Eruvin 45a) that allows besieged city residents to violate Shabbat in order to defend themselves
  • Students will explain three aspects of the Biblical cities of asylum
  • Students will explain the principle expressed in Exodus 21:24 (an eye for an eye) as a prohibition on excessive punishment, in the context of other contemporary legal systems
  • Students will identify the Israelite legal system as unique among ancient civilizations as categorizing theft as a civil, not a capital, offense
  • Students will identify a beit din as a panel of three rabbis empowered to render decisions of Jewish law
  • Students will identify the RAC as the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, the hub of Jewish social justice action and political advocacy
  • Students will explain the RAC’s role in the passage of civil rights legislation in the 1960s
  • Students will name two recent accomplishments of the RAC in national politics
  • Students will describe Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel as a Polish-American philosopher who inspired the Jewish fight for social justice

HOLIDAYS (different Sephardic and Ashkenazic traditions)

Students will name two differences between Sephardic and Ashkenazic celebrations of each Jewish holiday

ISRAEL (challenges to Israel today)

  • Students will be able to draw a timeline of major events in the history of the Israel/Palestinian conflict
  • Students will be able to describe Israel’s political coalition system
  • Students will be able to name the Israeli parties currently in power, and to describe basic aspects of their platforms
  • JEWISH LIFE & COMMUNITY (death/mourning customs, traditions)
  • Students will be able to identify on a map of Allentown, KILV’s Jewish cemetery
  • Students will be able to define the terms eulogy, kever, tahara, tahreeheem, hevra kadisha, avel, k’riah, Kaddish, shiva, and minyan
  • Students will be able to describe a traditional Jewish funeral and interment
  • Students will be able to name three traditions associated with shiva

ARTS AND LITERATURE

  • Students will be able to re-tell the East European legend of the golem
  • Students will be able to re-tell a folktale about the North African trickster, Joha
  • Students will be able to sing, with the song title and melody as cues, the following Hebrew songs:

- Eem Tirtsu
- Od Yeshama
- Sisu Et Yerushalayim
- V’Ha-er Einenu

Grade 8

AFFECTIVE GOALS

  • Students will transfer what they learn at school to a home environment
  • Students will participate in Friday evening Shabbat services
  • Students will feel that they are part of the Jewish community
  • Students will feel proud of the accomplishments of the Jewish people
  • Students will feel comfortable during Jewish rituals and services
  • Students will want to create art, music, or literature with Jewish themes
  • Students will feel an affinity with the state of Israel

HEBREW

Students will retain their reading fluency from previous year

PRAYER

Students will maintain fluency in shiva-minyan skills, birkat ha-mazon

BIBLE

            Samuel II

  • Students will be able to tell the story of how David learned of the death of Saul and Jonathan: Sam. II 1:1-27
  • SWBAT of David’s becoming king in Jerusalem: Sam. II 5:1-15
  • SWBAT explain Nathan’s role in David’s dynasty:  Sam. II  7:1-29
  • SWBAT tell of David, Uriah and Bathsheba: Sam. II  11:1 – 12:25
  • SWBAT tell of Absalom’s revolt against David:  Sam. II 18:1 – 19:1

            Jeremiah

  • SWBAT re-tell Jeremiah’s prediction of Israel’s punishment:  Jer. 9:16-23
  • SWBAT tell the allegory of the two baskets of figs: Jer. 24:1-10
  • SWBAT repeat from memory the weeping-Rachel verse:  Jer. 31:15
  • SWBAT sing the “Od Yeshama” quote from Jer. 33:10-11

            Ecclesiastes (Kohelet)

SWBAT recite from memory two of these quotations from Kohelet:

  • 1:17-18
  • 2:13-14
  • 2:18-19
  • 5:9-11
  • 9:11
  • 11:9-10
  • 12:12

…or one of the following quotations:

  • 3:1-8
  • 3:19-22
  • 4:9-12
  • 5:12-16
  • 7:5-9
  • 8:14-15
  • 9:7-10

HISTORY (Holocaust)

  • Students will name three signals of anti-Semitic speech
  • Students will name three signals of extremism in the public arena
  • Students will be able to distinguish propaganda from news
  • Students will explain the roots of anti-Semitism in western Europe
  • Students will describe Germans’ choices during Hitler’s rise to power
  • Students will summarize the three main phases of the Final Solution
  • Students will describe two examples of Jewish resistance
  • Students will describe two examples of non-Jewish resistance
  • Students will compare European Jewry before and after the Holocaust

ETHICS  (Commerce; poverty; IRC; Joseph Glaser, Henrietta Szold)

  • Students will be able to define dereh eretz as proper behavior
  • Students will defend or oppose on the Talmudic principle (Shabbat 31a): “In the next world, the first question asked is: "Were you honest in business?"
  • Students will re-state either:
    • Leviticus 19:35-36: “You shall not falsify measures of length, weight, or capacity. You shall have an honest balance, an honest weight, an honest ephah, and an honest hin."

      or
       
    • Leviticus 25:14: "When you sell anything to your neighbor or buy anything from your neighbor, you shall not deceive one another."
  • Students will be able to describe two applications, in modern commerce, of Bava Metzia 60a-b: One should not sift the beans at the top of the bushel because he is "deceiving the eye" by making the customer think that the entire bushel has been sifted. It is forbidden to paint animals or utensils in order to improve their appearance or cover up their defects.
  • Students will be able to describe an actual violation of Deuteronomy 24:14-15: “Do not take advantage of a hired worker who is poor and needy, whether that worker is a fellow Israelite or a foreigner...  Pay them their wages each day before sunset, because they are poor and are counting on it...”
  • Students will explain Dani Passow’s view of areyvut as communal responsibility.
  • Students will explain their preference of either Rabbi Akiva’s or Rabbi Tarfon’s positions about which is greater, action or study.
  • Students will be able to name Isaac Abravanel’s three reasons for giving tsedaka (to express mercy on the poor; to recognize the poor person as your relative; and to commit to sustaining your community). 
  • Students will explain their view of the contradiction in Deuteronomy 15 (verse four, “There shall be no needy among you,” and verse eleven, “For the poor will never cease from the land”).
  • Students will describe the role of Rabbi Joseph Glaser and community activist Fred Ross in the organization of California’s farm workers.
  • Students will summarize the accomplishments of Henrietta Szold as an educator, Zionist, and pioneer in public health.
  • Students will describe the founding of the International Rescue Committee, its original mission and its modern function.

HOLIDAYS

Students will explain the lunar cycle’s role in the Jewish calendar

ISRAEL

  • Students will be able to name the current Prime Minister of Israel and the parties currently in power
  • Students will be able to explain Israel’s political coalition system

JEWISH LIFE & COMMUNITY

  • Students will be able to name two American Jewish summer camps and describe how they differ from secular camps
  • Students will be able to name, and describe the missions of, three American Jewish charitable organizations
  • Students will be able to name, and describe the missions of, three international or Israeli charitable organizations

ARTS AND LITERATURE

  • Students will be able to name one modern Israeli writer and summarize one of his or her short stories or novels
  • Students will be able to name one modern Israeli poet and describe one of his or her poems

Grade 9

AFFECTIVE GOALS

  • Students will transfer what they learn at school to a home environment
  • Students will participate in Friday evening Shabbat services
  • Students will feel that they are part of the Jewish community
  • Students will feel proud of the accomplishments of the Jewish people
  • Students will feel comfortable during Jewish rituals and services
  • Students will want to create art, music, or literature with Jewish themes
  • Students will feel an affinity with the state of Israel

HEBREW

Students will retain their reading fluency from previous year

PRAYER

Students will maintain their ability to sing or chant the prayers of the Shabbat service, shiva minyan,and the birkat ha-mazon.

BIBLE  (Kings I, Ezekiel, Ruth)

            Kings I

  • SWBAT re-tell the story of David’s designation of Solomon as his heir:     Kings I  1:1-39
  • SWBAT re-tell the legend of Solomon’s wisdom:  Kings I  3:1-15
  • SWBAT re-tell the legend of Solomon’s judgment of two women:  Kings I           3:16-28
  • SWBAT re-tell the story of Solomon building the Temple:  Kings I  5:9-32
  • SWBAT name three physical aspects of the Temple: Kings I  6:1-7:51
  • SWBAT describe God’s warning to Solomon regarding the Temple:           Kings I, 9:1-9
  • SWBAT re-tell the story of Solomon and the Queen of Sheba:                       Kings I  10:1-13
  • SWBAT describe the decline of Solomon:  Kings I 11:1-13  and 11:41-43
  • SWBAT re-tell how the kingdom split into Israel under King Jeroboam (10 tribes) and Judah under Solomon’s son King Rehoboam (2 tribes):            Kings I   12:1-19
  • SWBAT describe the warning of the prophet Elijah to King Ahab of           Judah:  Kings I  17:1-24
  • SWBAT re-tell the story of Elijah’s challenge to the prophets of Ba’al:       Kings I   18:1-46
  • SWBAT re-tell the despair of Elijah and the still small voice that      summoned him back into service:  Kings I   19:1-21
  • SWBAT re-tell the story of Ahab, Jezebel and the vineyard of Naboth:      Kings I   21:1-29

            Ezekiel

  • SWBAT describe, in words or pictures, the vision of Ezekiel: Ez. 1:1 – 2:9
  • SWBAT re-tell the vision of the valley of dry bones:  Ez. 37:1-14

            Ruth

  • SWBAT re-tell the story of Naomi, Ruth and Boaz:  Ruth, chapters 1-4

HISTORY (American Jewish history)

  • Students will list the major events leading to the immigration of Jews to the New World in the 1500s and 1600s
  • Students will describe the social and legal status of Jews in colonial America
  • Students will briefly describe the roles of Francis Salvador, Mordecai Manuel Noah and Hayim Salomon in the American Revolution
  • Students will describe the immigration, settlement patterns and religious identity of German-Jewish immigrants in the mid-19th century
  • Students will briefly describe the westward journeys of Levi Strauss and Michael Goldwater
  • Students will list two reasons why Eastern European Jews began immigrating in large numbers beginning in 1883
  • Students will describe the language, religious practice and settlement patterns of East European Jewish immigrants in the U.S.
  • Students will describe the role of Jews in the early labor movement
  • Students will list three functions of the Yiddish press in the U.S.
  • Students will name three playwrights and three plays of the Yiddish theater in America
  • Students will describe three American nativist anti-Semites of the early 20th century
  • Students will describe three examples of anti-Semitism in the U.S.
  • Students will list three social-justice initiatives led by American Jews in the early 20th century

ETHICS / MITSVOT

  • Students will be able to name classical Jewish sources that respect and mandate the inclusion of individuals of the margins of society
  • Students will apply Jewish teachings to issues concerning the rights of gender minorities, people with disabilities, immigrants and the impoverished
  • Students will be able to explain current laws and practices concerning those who have historically been marginalized.
  • Students will be able to name the ways KI has or is practicing inclusion

HOLIDAYS

Students will be able to name the thirteen Hebrew months in order, and to place three Jewish holidays in their months

ISRAEL

  • Students will be able to name and describe three technical or medical innovations of Israeli scientists or IT developers
  • Students will describe the foreign-assistance mission of ISraid

JEWISH LIFE & COMMUNITY

  • Students will be able to name the four main denominations of Judaism, plus humanistic Judaism and Renewal Judaism
  • Students will be able to distinguish Jewish theology and practice from that of Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Confucianism and Hinduism

ARTS AND LITERATURE

  • Students will choose and share their choice of a song lyric by a contemporary Jewish composer
  • Students will choose and voice-record their choice of a contemporary siddur prayer or prayer commentary
  • Students will describe a Jewish theme in a modern film
  • Students will name, and describe a major work of, a modern Jewish artist

Grade 10

AFFECTIVE GOALS

  • Students will transfer what they learn at school to a home environment
  • Students will participate in Friday evening Shabbat services
  • Students will feel that they are part of the Jewish community
  • Students will feel proud of the accomplishments of the Jewish people
  • Students will feel comfortable during Jewish rituals and services
  • Students will want to create art, music, or literature with Jewish themes
  • Students will feel an affinity with the state of Israel

HEBREW

Students will retain their reading fluency from previous year

PRAYER

Students will maintain their ability to sing or chant the prayers of the Shabbat service, shiva minyan, and the birkat ha-mazon

BIBLE (Kings II, Lamentations, the Song of Songs)

            Confirmation

  • Students will be able to read their assigned Torah verses during their Confirmation service.

            Kings II

  • Students will be able to re-tell the story of the prophet Elijah’s ascension in a fiery chariot, as the passage of his mantle to Elisha (II Kings 2:1-18)
  • Students will be able to re-tell the Elisha miracle story about the oppressed widow (II Kings 4:1-7)
  • Students will be able to re-tell the Elisha miracle story about the revival of the Shunnemite woman’s son (II Kings 4:8-37)
  • Students will be able to re-tell the story of King Ahab of Israel, his wife Jezebel, Elijah and the vineyard of Naboth (I Kings 21:1-29)
  • Students will relate the story of the death of Jezebel (II Kings 9:30-37)
  • Students will explain the motivation for the construction of Hezekiah’s Tunnel outside Jerusalem (II Kings 1, 18:1-18) and the process of construction (II Chronicles 32:2-30), as confirmed by Isaiah (Is. 22:11)
  • Students will relate the death of Hezekiah and Isaiah’s prophecy of exile (II Kings 20:1-21)
  • Students will narrate the discovery by King Josiah of the scroll of Deuteronomy, and the prophecy of Huldah (II Kings 22:1-20)

            Lamentations

  • SWBAT recite from memory one of these selections from Lamentations:
    • 1:1 3
    • 4:14-15
    • 5:13-16
    • and in addition, 5:21

            The Song of Songs

  • Students will identify the following verses as parts of the Song of Songs:  1:5-6
    • 2:1-3
    • 3:1-8
    • 6:1-3
    • 8:6-7
  • Students will use a Song of Songs quotation to create a work of art

HISTORY

Students will be able to trace the sources of the contemporary difficulties between the Israelis and the Palestinians.

ETHICS

  • Students will participate in the Bernard and Audrey Rappaport L’Taken Social Justice Seminar of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, in Washington, D.C.
  • Students will compose thematic links between the Social Justice seminar and the contemporary situations and issues of which they are aware.
  • Students will create links between their Confirmation process and the social justice issues they have studied.
  • Students will cite Jewish sources about issues of medical ethics, including contraception, abortion, euthanasia, life support, and distribution of resources
  • Students will describe the roles of Kivie Kaplan and Jack Greenberg in the establishment of civil rights legislation in the U.S.

HOLIDAYS

Students will be able to describe one traditional observance, or one innovation, connected with each Jewish holiday, which appeals to them personally

JEWISH LIFE & COMMUNITY

Students will understand the role of Federation in the Lehigh Valley, and will participate in its annual Super Sunday fundraiser

ARTS AND LITERATURE

  • Students will be able to re-tell the East European superstitions about the dybbuk
  • Students will be able to re-tell a Sholom Aleichem story about Tevye the dairyman
  • Students will be able to describe two stories about the American immigrant experience by Jewish writers

Appendix

Hebrew Vocabulary List

Click HERE to access a printer-friendly list of Hebrew vocabulary for all grades.

Basic aspects of Jewish obligations about kindness

  • Visiting the sick
  • Honoring parents
  • Helping the poor
  • Respecting the elderly
  • Relieving the suffering of animals
  • Being a companion to lonely people
  • Comforting mourners

Major Jewish holidays

  • Shabbat
  • Rosh Hashana
  • Yom Kippur
  • Sukkot
  • Simhat Torah
  • Hanukkah
  • Tu B’Shvat
  • Purim
  • Passover (Pesah)
  • Lag B’Omer
  • Shavuot
  • Tisha B’Av

Basic Jewish obligations about the treatment of animals

  • It is kind to give water to thirsty animals (Genesis 24:19)
  • Farm animals may not be made to work on Shabbat (Exodus 20:10)
  • Do not take eggs from a nest if the mother bird is present (Deut. 22:6-7)
  • Do not cook a kid in its mother’s milk (Deut. 22:6)
  • Do not plow with an ox and a donkey together (Deut. 22:10)
  • Do not muzzle the ox when it treads out the grain (Deut. 25:4)
  • Torah does not allow us to inflict pain on any living creature (Shulhan Aruh)
  • You must feed your animals before you yourself eat (Maimonides)
  • To relieve an animal from pain or danger is a Biblical law (Rabbi J.J. Hertz)
  • A good man does not sell his animal to a cruel person (Sefer Hassidim)
  • If a pack animal collapses under its burden, you must unload it, even if it belongs to your enemy (Mishneh Torah)

The Books of the Hebrew Bible

Torah

  • Genesis
  • Exodus
  • Leviticus
  • Numbers
  • Deuteronomy

Prophets (Nevi’im)

  • Joshua
  • Judges
  • Samuel I & II
  • Kings I & II
  • Isaiah
  • Jeremiah
  • Ezekiel
  • The Twelve Minor Prophets

Writings (Ketuvim)

  • Psalms
  • Proverbs
  • Job
  • The Song of Songs
  • Ruth
  • Lamentations
  • Ecclesiastes (Kohelet)
  • Esther
  • Daniel
  • Ezra
  • Nehemiah
  • Chronicles I & II

Sayings of Rabbi Hillel the Elder

  • Do not judge your fellow man until you are in his place.
  • Whoever destroys one soul, it is as though he destroyed the entire world.  And whoever saves a life, it is as though he saved the entire world.
  • If I am not for myself, who is for me?  And if I am only for myself, what am I?  And if not now, when?
  • Where there are no men, strive to be a man.
  • That which is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbor.  That is the whole Torah; the rest is commentary.  Go and study.
  • Don’t say ‘When I have free time, I will study;’ perhaps you will never have free time.

Jewish Holiday Vocabulary

Rosh Hashana Yom Kippur
  • L’shana Tova Tikatevu
  • Shehehianu
  • shofar
  • tashlikh
  • Tishrei
  • Yom Ha-din
  • Yom Ha-zikaron
  • Yom T’ruah
  • Al Het
  • Ten Days of atonement
  • fasting
  • Kol Nidrei
  • tekiah, Sh’vareem, Tru’ah
  • t’shuva
  • tsedaka
  • yahrtseit
   
Sukkot Tu B’Shvat
  • etrog
  • Hag sameah
  • lulav
  • sukkah
  • z’man simhateinu
  • Hallel
  • eitz
  • Tu B’Shvat seder
  • Jewish National Fund
   
Simhat Torah Purim
  • B’raysheet
  • sofer
  • aron ha-kodesh
  • hakkafot
  • megillah
  • Adar
  • mashloah manot
  • gragger
  • hamentaschen
   
Shabbat Pesah / Passover
  • hallah
  • Kiddush
  • Ha-motzee
  • L’ha Dodi
  • havdala
  • Eliahu Ha-navee
  • oneg
  • afikoman
  • haggada
  • maror
  • matza
  • seder
  • hametz
  • haroset
   
Hanukkah Yom Ha-Atzma’ut
  • Hanukkiah
  • dreidl
  • Maccabees
  • Nes gadol haya sham
  • shamash
  • latkes
  • gelt
  • Antiochus
  • ner tamid
  • aliyah
  • Zionism
  • Hatikva
  • Kibbutz
  • magen David
  • medinat Yisrael
 
Shavuot  
  • omer
  • Mount Sinai
  • Ten Commandments
  • Shalosh regaleem

Parallels between Judaism and Islam

  • Belief in one formless God
  • Pilgrimages to holy places
  • Tsedaka (saddaqa) is obligatory
  • Regular prayer several times a day
  • Graven images forbidden
  • One weekly day of rest
  • Fasting is a kind of prayer

Commonly-used examples of forbidden speech behavior

  • You may not call a person by a derogatory nickname, or by any other embarrassing name, even if he is used to it.
  • You may not ask an uneducated person for an opinion on a scholarly matter (that would draw attention to his lack of knowledge or education).
  • You may not ask a merchant how much he would sell something for if you have no intention of buying.
  • You may not refer someone to another person for assistance when you know the other person cannot help.
  • You may not deceive a person, even if no harm is done by the deception; for example, you may not sell non-kosher meat to a non-Jew telling him that it is kosher, even though no harm is done to the non-Jew by this deception.
  • You may not sell a person damaged goods without identifying the damage, even if the price you give is fair for the goods in their damaged condition.
  • You may not offer a person a gift or invite a person to dinner if you know that the person will not accept.
  • You may not compliment a person if you do not mean it.

~ From jewfaq.org

Soloveitchik: Jewish foundation of personal responsibility

As the Torah teaches, G-d placed humans in the Garden of Eden l’ovdah uleshomra, ‘to work it and protect it.’ Rabbi Shlomo Riskin teaches that to be a shomer (a protector) means to be responsible. His rabbi, Rabbi Joseph Ber Soloveitchik taught this core Jewish value: I am responsible, therefore I am. Being responsible and taking responsibility is core to being human. This is very clear from Cain’s response to God when asked of Abel’s whereabouts: “Am I my brother’s keeper?” The term used is shomer, in the same sense of “protection” mentioned in the Garden of Eden. The Bible resoundingly answers, yes! 

~ from www.jewishecoseminars.com

Thu, October 1 2020 13 Tishrei 5781